Christ the King

Fr. Augusto Berrio, SJ

Christ the King

Daniel 7:13-14 | Revelation 1:5-8 | John 18:33b-37

A priest visited a parochial, elementary school. He asked the children: “What do you find good in school?” An eight-year-old boy said: “They treat us well and nobody bullies us.” Another girl said: “We feel safe because they respect us.” Children often say what they feel, when they are in a safe environment. If there are fear or threats, they do not dare to speak. You see how the managers were fulfilling their program: “learn, love and believe”.

Many of us, at some stage of life, in school, work or situations of power, have experienced abuse or “Bulling”. That produces fear and suffering. Some use the power to oppress others. It is necessary to face this situation, because otherwise life becomes miserable. People get sick and some even take their own lives.

Whether in school, or in the political and government world, we find oppression of freedom and abuse of power. Violence in the Middle East, in Syria and in Iraq, has shown us macabre examples of cutting off prisoners’ heads and other tortures to cause fear. We see it in governments that use violence. People are forced to leave their country, with their possessions, to look for a safer place. History tells us about a lot of violence in the past. But even today, we see greater abuses of oppression of the people in different ways.

This shows us the existence of two Kingdoms in our life. One is the kingdom of the world, where the power to oppress and dominate is used. The other is based on relationships of respect and love. We can feel this conflict, too, inside our hearts.

Jesus proclaimed his kingdom on the Mount of Beatitudes, by the Sea of ​​Galilee. A quiet and peaceful place He spoke of those who will inherit the Kingdom of God: the poor in the spirit, the humble, the meek, those who work for justice, those who seek peace, those who suffer for living their faith doing good. In the end they will be the winners, forming an immovable Kingdom. The opposite of those who rely on violence and threat.

Let’s examine our emotions. We may find hidden, violent attitudes toward others, that we dislike. We are asked to discover the truth about ourselves and ask for the Grace of God to purify us. To heal our hearts.

The Advent that begins the other week, is a time of preparation for Christmas, when we can become better followers of Jesus Christ, to serve in his Kingdom. Amen. A priest visited a parochial, elementary school. He asked the children: “What do you find good in school?” An eight-year-old boy said: “They treat us well and nobody bullies us.” Another girl said: “We feel safe because they respect us.” Children often say what they feel, when they are in a safe environment. If there are fear or threats, they do not dare to speak. You see how the managers were fulfilling their program: “learn, love and believe”.

Many of us, at some stage of life, in school, work or situations of power, have experienced abuse or “Bulling”. That produces fear and suffering. Some use the power to oppress others. It is necessary to face this situation, because otherwise life becomes miserable. People get sick and some even take their own lives.

Whether in school, or in the political and government world, we find oppression of freedom and abuse of power. Violence in the Middle East, in Syria and in Iraq, has shown us macabre examples of cutting off prisoners’ heads and other tortures to cause fear. We see it in governments that use violence. People are forced to leave their country, with their possessions, to look for a safer place. History tells us about a lot of violence in the past. But even today, we see greater abuses of oppression of the people in different ways.

This shows us the existence of two Kingdoms in our life. One is the kingdom of the world, where the power to oppress and dominate is used. The other is based on relationships of respect and love. We can feel this conflict, too, inside our hearts.

Jesus proclaimed his kingdom on the Mount of Beatitudes, by the Sea of ​​Galilee. A quiet and peaceful place He spoke of those who will inherit the Kingdom of God: the poor in the spirit, the humble, the meek, those who work for justice, those who seek peace, those who suffer for living their faith doing good. In the end they will be the winners, forming an immovable Kingdom. The opposite of those who rely on violence and threat.

Let’s examine our emotions. We may find hidden, violent attitudes toward others, that we dislike. We are asked to discover the truth about ourselves and ask for the Grace of God to purify us. To heal our hearts.

The Advent that begins the other week, is a time of preparation for Christmas, when we can become better followers of Jesus Christ, to serve in his Kingdom. Amen.

A priest visited a parochial, elementary school. He asked the children: “What do you find good in school?” An eight-year-old boy said: “They treat us well and nobody bullies us.” Another girl said: “We feel safe because they respect us.” Children often say what they feel, when they are in a safe environment. If there are fear or threats, they do not dare to speak. You see how the managers were fulfilling their program: “learn, love and believe”.

Many of us, at some stage of life, in school, work or situations of power, have experienced abuse or “Bulling”. That produces fear and suffering. Some use the power to oppress others. It is necessary to face this situation, because otherwise life becomes miserable. People get sick and some even take their own lives.

Whether in school, or in the political and government world, we find oppression of freedom and abuse of power. Violence in the Middle East, in Syria and in Iraq, has shown us macabre examples of cutting off prisoners’ heads and other tortures to cause fear. We see it in governments that use violence. People are forced to leave their country, with their possessions, to look for a safer place. History tells us about a lot of violence in the past. But even today, we see greater abuses of oppression of the people in different ways.

This shows us the existence of two Kingdoms in our life. One is the kingdom of the world, where the power to oppress and dominate is used. The other is based on relationships of respect and love. We can feel this conflict, too, inside our hearts.

Jesus proclaimed his kingdom on the Mount of Beatitudes, by the Sea of ​​Galilee. A quiet and peaceful place He spoke of those who will inherit the Kingdom of God: the poor in the spirit, the humble, the meek, those who work for justice, those who seek peace, those who suffer for living their faith doing good. In the end they will be the winners, forming an immovable Kingdom. The opposite of those who rely on violence and threat.

Let’s examine our emotions. We may find hidden, violent attitudes toward others, that we dislike. We are asked to discover the truth about ourselves and ask for the Grace of God to purify us. To heal our hearts.

The Advent that begins the other week, is a time of preparation for Christmas, when we can become better followers of Jesus Christ, to serve in his Kingdom. Amen. A priest visited a parochial, elementary school. He asked the children: “What do you find good in school?” An eight-year-old boy said: “They treat us well and nobody bullies us.” Another girl said: “We feel safe because they respect us.” Children often say what they feel, when they are in a safe environment. If there are fear or threats, they do not dare to speak. You see how the managers were fulfilling their program: “learn, love and believe”.

Many of us, at some stage of life, in school, work or situations of power, have experienced abuse or “Bulling”. That produces fear and suffering. Some use the power to oppress others. It is necessary to face this situation, because otherwise life becomes miserable. People get sick and some even take their own lives.

Whether in school, or in the political and government world, we find oppression of freedom and abuse of power. Violence in the Middle East, in Syria and in Iraq, has shown us macabre examples of cutting off prisoners’ heads and other tortures to cause fear. We see it in governments that use violence. People are forced to leave their country, with their possessions, to look for a safer place. History tells us about a lot of violence in the past. But even today, we see greater abuses of oppression of the people in different ways.

This shows us the existence of two Kingdoms in our life. One is the kingdom of the world, where the power to oppress and dominate is used. The other is based on relationships of respect and love. We can feel this conflict, too, inside our hearts.

Jesus proclaimed his kingdom on the Mount of Beatitudes, by the Sea of ​​Galilee. A quiet and peaceful place He spoke of those who will inherit the Kingdom of God: the poor in the spirit, the humble, the meek, those who work for justice, those who seek peace, those who suffer for living their faith doing good. In the end they will be the winners, forming an immovable Kingdom. The opposite of those who rely on violence and threat.

Let’s examine our emotions. We may find hidden, violent attitudes toward others, that we dislike. We are asked to discover the truth about ourselves and ask for the Grace of God to purify us. To heal our hearts.

The Advent that begins the other week, is a time of preparation for Christmas, when we can become better followers of Jesus Christ, to serve in his Kingdom. Amen.